Monday, October 23, 2017
 
Alin, Simone

Monday, April 25, 2016

Alin, Simone

Understanding the ocean's changing chemistry

Ocean chemistry is changing faster right now than at any time over the past 50 million years. “We are fundamentally altering marine ecosystems,” says NOAA oceanographer Simone Alin, Ph.D. With her colleagues at NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), Alin is responsible for monitoring the rapidly changing chemistry of seawater and understanding the ramifications for the world’s oceans, particularly the highly productive, fisheries-rich coastal waters off the west coast of North America. 

Bringing Back the Fish

Thursday, August 9, 2012

Bringing Back the Fish

Michigan Sea Grant Oversees Successful Habitat Reconstruction

Michigan Sea Grant is overseeing a long-term restoration project to restore fish spawning habitat for native fish species. An acre of rock reefs were constructed in the Middle Channel of the St. Clair River in the spring of 2012 — and fish are already using the reefs.  “It is science in action,” said Jennifer Read, assistant director of Michigan Sea Grant and project lead. “We were still constructing reefs a few hundred feet away, and yet, here they were…”

California Sea Grant study examines year-old NOAA West Coast catch shares program

Monday, March 26, 2012

California Sea Grant study examines year-old NOAA West Coast catch shares program

A new NOAA Sea Grant project will examine the ongoing effects of a new catch-shares policy in helping the fleet become both ecologically and economically viable.
Carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean is increasing faster than expected

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean is increasing faster than expected

Ocean acidity is also rising rapidly

New NOAA research has revealed unprecedented changes in ocean carbon dioxide in the tropical Pacific Ocean over the last 14 years, influencing the role the oceans play in current and projected global warming and ocean acidification. Natural variability has dominated patterns in ocean CO2 in this region, but observations now show human activity contributes to increasing CO2 levels.

Cracking the code of a long-distance swimmer

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Cracking the code of a long-distance swimmer

Research sheds light on eel migration from subtropics to European rivers

Born in the Sargasso Sea, that Atlantic Ocean gyre east of Bermuda, baby European eels will travel 4,000 miles to the freshwater rivers of Europe. Now scientists might have answered a century-old question of how these young eels accomplish such vast oceanic migrations.


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