Saturday, April 29, 2017
 
Asian emissions can increase ground-level ozone pollution in U.S. West

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Asian emissions can increase ground-level ozone pollution in U.S. West

Springtime air pollution from Asia, swept across the Pacific Ocean on winds, can contribute to episodes of high surface ozone pollution in the western United States.

Colorado report: climate change projected to reduce water in streams, increase water needs for crops, cities

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Colorado report: climate change projected to reduce water in streams, increase water needs for crops, cities

Rising temperatures will tend to reduce the amount of water in many of Colorado’s streams and rivers, melt mountain snowpack earlier in the spring, and increase the water needed by thirsty crops and cities, according to the new report, “Climate Change in Colorado: A Synthesis to Support Water Resources Management and Adaptation,” which updates and expands upon an initial report released in 2008.

De Boer, Gijs

NOAA scientist wins Presidential award for using science drones to understand climate change in the Arctic

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De Boer, Gijs

NOAA/CIRES scientist Gijs de Boer wins Presidential award for using science drones to understand climate change in the Arctic. “I love being part of the UAV revolution,” says de Boer.

Methane leaks from three large U.S. natural gas fields in line with federal estimates

Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, NOAA researchers, colleagues measure lower emissions of the greenhouse gas than some other sites

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Methane leaks from three large U.S. natural gas fields in line with federal estimates

Tens of thousands of pounds of methane leak per hour from equipment in three major natural gas basins that span Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas and Pennsylvania, according to airborne measurements published today by a NOAA-led team of scientists. But the overall leak rate from those basins is only about one percent of gas production there—lower than leak rates measured in other gas fields, and in line with federal estimates.

Neely, Ryan

Putting A Laser Focus on Climate Change

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Neely, Ryan

A physical scientist for NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES) at the University of Colorado, Boulder, Ryan Neely uses light detection and ranging (lidar) to study the relationship between particles in the stratosphere and climate.

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