Friday, October 20, 2017
 

Barnes, Elizabeth

Questioning rivers in the sky

Mike Walker 0 2889 Article rating: No rating

Since the 1960s scientists have used the so-called "butterfly effect" to explain why we struggle to predict such extreme events with more than two weeks of advanced notice. But Elizabeth Barnes, Assistant Professor at Colorado State University, is pushing the envelope. Barnes likes making complex things simple, and with her team is turning the theory about Earth’s chaotic weather patterns on its head.

Maloney, Eric

Understanding the mysterious Madden-Julian Oscillation

Mike Walker 0 2209 Article rating: No rating

From the front lawn of his childhood home in the Chicago suburbs, Eric Maloney, Professor at Colorado State University and NOAA-funded scientist, experienced extreme weather ranging from blizzards to severe thunderstorms. As a kid, he even videotaped a tornado. Maloney has been fascinated with the weather ever since.

Nielsen-Gammon, John

Informing Texas with climate data and information

Mike Walker 0 7892 Article rating: No rating

Texas State Climatologist and NOAA-funded scientist, John Nielsen-Gammon, has helped the state of Texas make the best possible use of weather and climate information for 17 years. “I became a climatologist before I actually did any climatology work,” he said. Texas State Climatologist and NOAA-funded scientist, John Nielsen-Gammon, has helped the state of Texas make the best possible use of weather and climate information for 17 years. “I became a climatologist before I actually did any climatology work,” he said.

Otkin, Jason

Predicting rapidly-developing droughts based on plant stress

Anupa 0 8452 Article rating: No rating

Growing up on a farm in Minnesota, Jason Otkin felt that the weather controlled everything in his life. In the middle of “farm country,” Otkin’s parents made a living herding cattle and growing corn, soybeans, alfalfa, and wheat. The farm was home to sandy ground that tended to dry up quickly in the summer after some hot and dry weather, causing crop conditions to rapidly deteriorate.

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