Tuesday, April 25, 2017
 
Rural West sees more smog; now scientists may know why

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Rural West sees more smog; now scientists may know why

Ground-level ozone, also known as smog, has climbed in the rural West over the past 25 years, even in such seemingly pristine places as Yellowstone National Park. Now, scientists may have found out why – and why cutting our own output of smog-forming chemicals such as nitrogen oxide hasn’t helped.
Accounting for Denver’s Ozone

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Accounting for Denver’s Ozone

The first peer-reviewed study to quantify oil and gas emissions on Colorado's northern Front Range confirms that energy development is an important contributor to the region’s chronic ozone problem. The NOAA-CIRES research was published August 8 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres

HFC greenhouse gases: a tale of two (or more) futures

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

HFC greenhouse gases: a tale of two (or more) futures

new paper appearing online in Atmospheric Environment  coauthored by researchers at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory looked at the climate implications of various proposals for future HFC use that are being discussed this week under the United Nations Montreal Protocol, the global agreement that protects the ozone layer. 
Annual Antarctic ozone hole larger and formed later in 2015

Thursday, October 29, 2015

Annual Antarctic ozone hole larger and formed later in 2015

The 2015 Antarctic ozone hole area was larger and formed later than in recent years, according to scientists from NOAA and NASA.

On Oct. 2, 2015, the ozone hole expanded to its peak of 28.2 million square kilometers (10.9 million square miles), an area larger than the continent of North America. Throughout October, the hole remained large and set many area daily records.

Stratosphere an Accomplice for Santa Ana Winds and California Wildfires

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Stratosphere an Accomplice for Santa Ana Winds and California Wildfires

The hot and dry Santa Ana winds are associated with many of Southern California’s destructive wildfires, and even take the blame for tense, ugly moods. Now, NOAA researchers have found that on occasion the winds have an accomplice in contributing to California’s wildfires: atmospheric events known as stratospheric intrusions, which bring extremely dry air from the upper atmosphere down to the surface.

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