Friday, February 23, 2018
 

Consumer, industrial products now a major urban air pollution source

New study finds big impact from paints, pesticides, perfumes as vehicle emissions drop

Monica.Allen 0 641

Chemical products like household cleaners, pesticides, paints and perfumes that contain compounds refined from petroleum now rival motor vehicle emissions as the top source of urban air pollution, according to a surprising NOAA-led study

Research finds spike in dust storms in American Southwest driven by...

More dust storms may be contributing to dramatic rise in Valley fever in the Southwest

Monica.Allen 0 4764

People living in the American Southwest have experienced a dramatic increase in windblown dust storms in the last two decades, likely driven by large-scale changes in sea surface temperature in the Pacific Ocean drying the region’s soil, according to new NOAA-led research.

New NOAA-led study measures soot from North Dakota flaring in oil and...

Flaring produces an estimated 4 tons of black carbon per day, not considered significant for climate

Monica.Allen 0 19972

In the lonely reaches of northwestern North Dakota and across the border into Saskatchewan, the vast Bakken oil field hosts extensive activities to extract both crude oil and natural gas. Business is booming—production increased by 30 percent between May 2013 and May 2014. More than a quarter of the total gas produced from the Bakken operations can’t be processed fast enough, though, and the common industry practice is to flare it—burn it off as it is vented to the atmosphere. Jutting 30 feet upward like enormous lit matchsticks, the flares pose a new question for atmospheric scientists: What do the flares put into the air? A new NOAA-led study has produced the first direct measurements of how much black carbon—a major component of airborne particles that are commonly referred to as soot —is emitted by the Bakken flaring operations.

Stratosphere an Accomplice for Santa Ana Winds and California Wildfires

Monica.Allen 0 16900

The hot and dry Santa Ana winds are associated with many of Southern California’s destructive wildfires, and even take the blame for tense, ugly moods. Now, NOAA researchers have found that on occasion the winds have an accomplice in contributing to California’s wildfires: atmospheric events known as stratospheric intrusions, which bring extremely dry air from the upper atmosphere down to the surface.

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