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Searching for tiny clues to changing seas

Searching for tiny clues to changing seas

An annual zooplankton surveys help scientists track the health of the Bering and Chukchi seas.  

August 22, 2019 0 Comments
New 'atlas' reveals Earth's microscopic communities

New 'atlas' reveals Earth's microscopic communities

By Sierra Sarkis, NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

The planet is home to a vast number of microscopic living organisms - plants, animals, and bacteria- found from deep sea volcanoes to the highest mountain peaks. These organisms too small to be seen by the naked eye affect both human health and the health of the world’s ecosystems. Despite their centrality to life on Earth, scientists have a limited understanding of their fundamental structure. 

November 1, 2017 0 Comments
NOAA scientists set sail on Coast Guard icebreaker to measure change in the Arctic

NOAA scientists set sail on Coast Guard icebreaker to measure change in the Arctic

On Friday, August 25, U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy will sail from Dutch Harbor, Alaska, with a team of NOAA scientists and collaborators on a 22-day cruise to study environmental change in the western Arctic Ocean.

August 22, 2017 0 Comments
New study finds Alaskans familiar with ocean acidification, not aware of risks to fisheries

New study finds Alaskans familiar with ocean acidification, not aware of risks to fisheries

New research published in Marine Policy from the first Alaska-focused study on public understanding and awareness of ocean acidification risk shows that Alaskans are three times more aware of ocean acidification than Americans in general.  However, Alaskans have difficulty seeing ocean acidification as an immediate risk, and the direct risks to Alaska’s fisheries are still not well understood. The research, “Gauging perceptions of ocean acidification in Alaska,” can be read online.


December 22, 2014 0 Comments
NOAA contributes key carbon dioxide data to global carbon assessment

NOAA contributes key carbon dioxide data to global carbon assessment

A global report released this week on changing carbon dioxide levels in Earth’s atmosphere, oceans, and land environment draws heavily from data and observations by NOAA research scientists and their partners. For the first time, the annual assessment by the Global Carbon Project uses data obtained from autonomous instruments installed by NOAA scientists on its ships and other ships of opportunity and moorings to determine the variability of  carbon dioxide in the surface ocean. 

September 25, 2014 0 Comments
NOAA and partner scientists study ocean acidification in Prince William Sound

NOAA and partner scientists study ocean acidification in Prince William Sound

Scientists from NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, the University of Alaska and the Alaska Ocean Observing System are teaming up this summer and early fall to use new unmanned tools to study how melting glaciers in Alaska’s Prince William Sound may be intensifying ocean acidification in the sound and on the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf. 

July 8, 2014 0 Comments
Pacific island is natural laboratory to study ocean acidification

Pacific island is natural laboratory to study ocean acidification

Ian Enochs, a scientist with NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami, traveled in May to the Island of Maug in the Pacific Ocean as part of a NOAA expedition aboard NOAA Ship Hi’ialakai to study coral reef ecosystems. We caught up with Enochs to learn about his research on underwater vents that seep carbon dioxide into the Pacific.

July 1, 2014 0 Comments
NOAA Researchers Contribute to The 3rd National Climate Assessment Revealing the Latest Impacts of Climate Change on the U.S.

NOAA Researchers Contribute to The 3rd National Climate Assessment Revealing the Latest Impacts of Climate Change on the U.S.

We spoke with NOAA Research’s three contributing authors to the U.S. Global Change Research Program’s 3rd National Climate Assessment (NCA) released May 6, 2014 to understand their contribution to the NCA. According to the U.S. Global Change Research Program, the 3rd NCA is a compilation of scientific information on climate change from multiple sources and institutions and is a valuable resource in communicating and understanding climate change science and the impacts of climate change on the United States. The NCA will be used by federal scientists and managers, U.S. communities and citizens, and commercial businesses to improve environmental sustainability.
May 4, 2014 0 Comments
NOAA-led researchers discover ocean acidity is dissolving shells of tiny snails off West Coast

NOAA-led researchers discover ocean acidity is dissolving shells of tiny snails off West Coast

A NOAA-led research team has found the first evidence that acidity of continental shelf waters off the West Coast is dissolving the shells of tiny free-swimming marine snails, called pteropods, which provide food for pink salmon, mackerel and herring, according to a new paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
April 30, 2014 0 Comments
New global assessment examines air pollutants falling on the Earth’s surface

New global assessment examines air pollutants falling on the Earth’s surface

We sat down with Richard Artz, environmental scientist at NOAA’s Air Resources Laboratory, to learn more about the new global assessment of air pollutants that fall to the earth in precipitation and in dry form. The assessment is available online in the journal Atmospheric Environment.

April 15, 2014 0 Comments
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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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