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NOAA releases roadmap for the next 7 years of research and development

NOAA releases roadmap for the next 7 years of research and development

June 29, 2020 0 Comments
NOAA collects a lot of data on the ocean. Here are 4 ways we use it.

NOAA collects a lot of data on the ocean. Here are 4 ways we use it.

June 8, 2020 0 Comments
NOAA leads community scientists in mapping hottest parts of 13 U.S. cities this summer

NOAA leads community scientists in mapping hottest parts of 13 U.S. cities this summer

Running barefoot from scorching asphalt to cool grass in the summertime as a kid, you likely learned how cityscapes tend to get much warmer than green spaces. Extreme heat can be fatal, and buildings and pavement increase its threat, making some parts of cities up to 20°F hotter than other parts.

June 3, 2020 0 Comments
NOAA’s Climate Program Office announces new Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellows

NOAA’s Climate Program Office announces new Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellows

Eight new postdoctoral fellows are commencing cutting-edge research projects that will contribute innovative climate science to the research community as well as NOAA’s mission.

March 30, 2020 0 Comments
NOAA Science Report highlights 2019 research accomplishments

NOAA Science Report highlights 2019 research accomplishments

March 3, 2020 0 Comments
Storm-induced sea level spikes expected to increase on the Gulf and Atlantic coasts

Storm-induced sea level spikes expected to increase on the Gulf and Atlantic coasts

Using a new powerful NOAA global climate model, NOAA and partner researchers show that big storm-induced spikes in sea levels will increase in the future from the Gulf Coast to the Atlantic coast as warming progresses, but will be driven by differing forces.

February 13, 2020 0 Comments
Barbadian students tour NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown

Barbadian students tour NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown

Air & Sea Chronicles

Editor's note: Air & Sea Chronicles is NOAA's blog series documenting the ATOMIC mission in Barbados. This post is by Cindy Sandoval, a communications specialist from NOAA Fisheries who was on detial assisting NOAA Communications with ATOMIC outreach. 

Over 50 Barbadian or Bajan students toured NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown during the vessel’s short port call in Bridgetown, Barbados. While aboard, students learned about NOAA’s mission, the role the vessel plays in cutting-edge research, and why their island nation is at the center of an unprecedented effort to better understand the interactions of atmosphere and ocean. 

February 12, 2020 0 Comments
Climate change could trigger more landslides in High Mountain Asia

Climate change could trigger more landslides in High Mountain Asia

More frequent and intense rainfall events due to climate change could cause more landslides in the High Mountain Asia region of China, Tibet and Nepal, according to the first quantitative study of the link between precipitation and landslides in the region.

 

February 11, 2020 0 Comments
A Sea of Sondes

A Sea of Sondes

Air & Sea Chronicles is NOAA's blog series documenting the ATOMIC mission in Barbados. This is the third post from Janet Intrieri, a research scientist from NOAA's Earth System Research Lab Physical Sciences Division, who gives us a recap of a week releasing weather balloons on the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown.

January 24, 2020 0 Comments
Wave gliders, ocean drifters and drones to help international researchers solve key climate question

Wave gliders, ocean drifters and drones to help international researchers solve key climate question

American and European scientists are deploying dozens of autonomous and remotely-piloted instrument platforms to capture simultaneous observations of the lower atmosphere and the upper ocean offshore of Barbados with unprecedented detail.

January 23, 2020 0 Comments
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Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) - or "NOAA Research" - provides the research foundation for understanding the complex systems that support our planet. Working in partnership with other organizational units of the NOAA, a bureau of the Department of Commerce, NOAA Research enables better forecasts, earlier warnings for natural disasters, and a greater understanding of the Earth. Our role is to provide unbiased science to better manage the environment, nationally, and globally.

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